January 2016 TAO Chapter News

Northeast Region

Participants at Waterbury program with Gilbert & Butler tracker organ

Participants at Waterbury program with Gilbert & Butler tracker organ

Waterbury, CT

September 11, a catered dinner was held on a patio atop Albritton Hall at Wesleyan University. The weather and view were spectacular. The dinner was followed by the annual “Bach to School” recital by resident professor Ronald Ebrecht on the university’s Holt­kamp organ in Memorial Chap­el. The program included fun pieces by local composer Neely Bruce with jazz influence and percussion accompaniment.

October 30, a chapter meeting was held at Bristol Baptist/Synergy Church, where members were encouraged to invite and bring friends who may not be members of the AGO. A pizza dinner was provided, time was allowed for getting to know one another, and the year’s upcoming programs were outlined. Then, there was “open organ bench” time on the church’s II/8 Gilbert & Butler tracker organ (1895). This organ was purchased by the church in 2010 and restored by Richard Hamar of Norwich, Conn.

—William Degan

Julian Wachner, Janet Yieh, Forrest Eimold, Scott Allen Jarrett ,and Peter Krasinski (dean) at Boston program

Julian Wachner, Janet Yieh, Forrest Eimold, Scott Allen Jarrett ,and Peter Krasinski (dean) at Boston program

Boston, MA

September 8, the chapter held its opening service and installation of officers at St. Cecilia’s Church. The Rev. Carl Daw (chapter chaplain) offered prayers and thoughts on this day, which included a plethora of musical offerings: critically acclaimed conductor and composer Julian Wachner and the Grammy-nominated Trinity Wall Street Choir with organist Avi Stein were joined by conductor Scott Allen Jarrett, the Marsh Chapel Choir at Boston University, the Majestic Brass Quintet, and Eric Berlin, principal trumpeter of the Albany Symphony and Boston Philharmonic orchestras. In addition, young organists Forrest Eimold and Janet Yieh played the prelude and postlude, respectively.

—Claire DeCusati

Cape-Cod-MA-AGO-Chapter-News

Grace McGill-Gora (dean), Joan Kirchner (sub-dean), and recitalist Judith Hancock (Cape Cod and the Islands)

Cape Cod and the Islands

October 18, the chapter, along with Karen McFarlane Artists, presented Judith Hancock in a recital on the newly installed Casavant organ at the Dennis Union (UCC) Church. Hancock delighted the audience with her masterful and brilliant artistry. Her program ranged from French Baroque to pieces by Bux­tehude and Mendelssohn. The second half of the program was dedicated to her beloved and esteemed late husband, Gerre Hancock. Showcased were some of his works, including a prelude and fugue on the tune of “Draw Us in the Spirit’s Tether” (Har­old Frie­dell), published in 1983; a hymn-tune meditation on “St. Denio”; and variations on “Palm Beach,” which was commissioned by and dedicated to the Association of Anglican Musicians at its 2000 convention in Palm Beach, Fla. Members were excited to learn that Hancock traveled from New York City to Cape Cod to perform for us on her birthday! A small celebration was held later at a local restaurant.

—Grace McGill-Gora

Margaret Kotylo (honoree), Joseph Kotylo, Peggy Bennett, and the Rev. Timothy Bennett at Binghamton reception

Margaret Kotylo (honoree), Joseph Kotylo, Peggy Bennett, and the Rev. Timothy Bennett at Binghamton reception

Binghamton, NY

October 18, Joseph Kotylo reached the milestone of 40 years as organist of Main Street Baptist Church. In celebration of that achievement, the church held a special reception in his honor after the Sunday morning service. Hosted by the Rev. Timothy Bennett and his wife, Peggy, the reception featured a congratulatory speech by Rev. Bennett followed by Kotylo’s remarks to the assembled crowd, expressing his thanks for the support he has gotten from the congregation over the years. Kotylo’s special postlude at the end of the morning service had drawn a standing ovation from the large and appreciative congregation. The reception was attended by several fellow AGO members.

—John Holt

Westchester County recitalists with Dean John King (front, second from right): Kyoko Meredith, Janet Jacobson, Margaret Kim, Sandor Szabo; (back) Tim Keenan-Devlin, Craig Degener, Anthony Rispo, Frank Miller, Terence Flanagan, and Jonathan Riss (photo: Virginia Bender)

Westchester County recitalists with Dean John King (front, second from right): Kyoko Meredith, Janet Jacobson, Margaret Kim, Sandor Szabo; (back) Tim Keenan-Devlin, Craig Degener, Anthony Rispo, Frank Miller, Terence Flanagan, and Jonathan Riss (photo: Virginia Bender)

Westchester County, NY

October 25, a members’ recital was held at White Plains Presbyterian Church (host Jonathan Riss, minister of music). An exciting program featured music of Bach, Dubois, Messiaen, Miller, Rispo, Robinson, and Sowerby. Two members played their own compositions; one was a hymn-tune improvisation. The three-manual, 48-rank Austin (1964) offered great color contrasts at the hands of Craig Degener, Terence Flan­igan, Janet Jacobson, Tim Kee­nan-Devlin, Margaret Kim, Kyoko Meredith, Frank Miller, Anthony Rispo, Jona­than Riss, and Sandor Szabo. A reception prepared by the Millers followed the concert and topped off a lovely afternoon.

—Joyce Gardner

Stephen Martorella (minister of music at the First Baptist Church in America) with Jeannine and David Jordan (Rhode Island)

Stephen Martorella (minister of music at the First Baptist Church in America) with Jeannine and David Jordan (Rhode Island)

Rhode Island

September 18, the chapter hosted David and Jeannine Jordan’s live organ and multimedia program “From Sea to Shining Sea,” celebrating the 201st anniversary of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the historic First Baptist Church in America, to an enthusiastic and diverse audience. The program intersected many communities, from the colleges and universities of the area to the historic-district organizations, music groups, and church groups.

—Stephen Martorella

Vermont

To sum up the 2014–15 year: The chapter’s programming began with an organ tour of four churches in Rutland. The organs were demonstrated by members of the Rutland community as well as chapter members. Information about the organs was provided by Ed Boad­way, who is also a member of the Organ Historical Society.

• In March, Carl Schwartz organ­ized a Bach Marathon on the Karl Wilhelm organ in Christ Church Episcopal, Montpelier. This event was well attended.

• Workshops were held at the Bethany Congregational Church in Randolph, and Susan Summerfield and guests celebrated the 150th anniversary of the 1864 E. & G.G. Hook & Hastings organ in First Baptist Church, Burlington. Lynnette Combs also performed in a series of concerts celebrating this historic tracker organ.

Vermont members and friends at recital by Jim Cassarino, Artist of the Year, in Rutland’s Trinity Church

Vermont members and friends at recital by Jim Cassarino, Artist of the Year, in Rutland’s Trinity Church

• A very successful progressive members’ recital featured the organs in St. Albans.

• In June, chapter Artist of the Year Jim Cassarino, with guest artists, performed in Trinity Episcopal Church, Rutland.

• At the OHS Convention in June, Sub-dean Vaughn Watson demonstrated the 1898 Emmons Howard organ at the Jewish Community Center in Am­herst, Mass. The chapter looks forward to another year of exciting events in Vermont.

—Esther Nui

Europe

September 25, the chapter held its fall meeting in Ingelheim (in the Rhine Valley of Germany), location of an authentic E.M. Skinner organ originally installed in Passaic, N.J. The 1930 instrument was purchased by the Saalkirche parish and reinstalled there by the Klais Organ Company of Bonn, Germany, in 2013. The event opened with a buffet-style supper in the parish hall preceding the 35th International Organ Concert, which featured five chapter members from Europe and the United States: Johan Hermans (Belgium), Christa Rakich (Connecticut), Giorgio Parolini (Italy), and Carsten & Iris Lenz (Ingelheim). The program included works by Alexandre Guilmant, James Woodman, Pietro Yon, Robin Dinda, and others. Saturday morning opened with a lecture on “The Development of the American Organ up to E.M. Skinner” by Bernard Sanders (secretary), who traced the lineage from Tannenberg through Hook, Hutchings, Steere & Turner, and other important figures and factors influencing the style and circumstances leading up to Skinner’s legendary innovations and subsequent success. After the lecture, Carsten Lenz demonstrated the many specialties that earmarked the Skinner organs of this period, including (but not limited to) whiffle-tree Swell shade mechanism, AGO-standard console, characteristic stops such as Erzähler, French Horn, Orchestral Oboe, and six different pairs of celeste ranks (Flauto dolce, Erzähler, Gambe, Echo Viole, Salicional, Dulciana).

Participants at European chapter event

Participants at European chapter event

After lunch at a local restaurant, participants made an excursion to the Organ Art Museum—where there is a comprehensive collection of historical instruments and copies—in nearby Winde­sheim. The group was allowed to try all of the instruments. That afternoon, the final concert in the Saalkirche organ series, “Fascination Organ: 30 Minutes of Organ Music for the Coffee Hour,” featured AGO members Agnes Goerke (Finland), Fabrice Muller (France) and Pawel Wrobel (Poland) playing works by Arbeau, Lemare, Howells, Brew­er, and Surzynski to an appreciative audience. A group dinner followed at a nearby Spanish restaurant. The closing event of the fall meeting was the Sunday morning service, at which three additional members played both church organs (besides the Skinner instrument, there is also a historical Dreymann organ from 1853 in a side balcony). Kate­lyn Emerson (United States) and Julien Girard (France) played music of Campra, Bach, Brahms, and Ireland. Bernard Sanders (Germany) and house organist Carsten Lenz joined forces to accompany the hymns, alternating between the two organs. Dean Judy Riefel-Lindel thanked all participants for their contributions to the weekend, and especially Carsten and Iris Lenz for their planning and preparation. She also invited everyone to the spring meeting after Easter 2016, in Scotland. Some members were then able to enjoy the red-wine festival that had opened in Ingelheim on Saturday evening.

—Bernard Sanders

Finland

In November, the chapter presented a masterclass with Kimberly Marshall for the students of the church music and organ department of the Sibelius Academy in Kuopio, Helsinki, and Kotka (host Timo Kiiskinen, chapter registrar and vice chair of the academy’s church music department). The academy offers tuition-free English-language study in a five-and-a-half-year combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program (organ department), as well as a two-and-a-half-year master’s degree program (church music department). For more information, visit https://www.uniarts.fi/en/apply-to-sibelius-academy.

• The purpose of the Finland chapter, founded in spring 2015, is to create and promote cultural relations between Finland and the United States in the fields of organ, choral, and church music—including publications, edu­cation, organbuilding, and teacher/artist exhanges. It is a great honor for us to join the community of the AGO.

—Kalle Toivio

Mid-Atlantic Region

Henry Lowe and Olivier Latry at postrecital reception in Baltimore (photo: David Crandall)

Henry Lowe and Olivier Latry at postrecital reception in Baltimore (photo: David Crandall)

Baltimore, MD

October 25, Oli­vier Latry, titular organist at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris, appeared in recital at the Church of the Redeemer (Henry Lowe, organist-director of music). The event was jointly sponsored by the chapter and the church. Latry’s program featured transcriptions of works by Khatchaturian, de Falla, Liszt, and Saint-Saëns, as well as selections by Mobberley and Duruflé, and concluded with Latry’s improvisation on the introductory theme of “Sine Nomine.” Those present enjoyed meeting the artist at a festive champagne reception following the recital.

—Kitty Allen

Potomac-MD-AGO-Chapter-News

Recitalist Renée Anne Louprette and Sub-dean Brenda Weiser (Potomac)

Potomac, MD

October 4
, the chapter hosted a recital by Renée Anne Louprette. The event was cosponsored by the Northern Virginia and District of Colum­bia chapters and the Washington National Cathedral. The recital was presented as a PipeSpectacular event, well-befitting the Great Organ (IV/189 Ernest M. Skinner) and magnificent space of the cathedral. Michael McCar­thy, director of music there, gave the welcoming remarks; and Brenda Weiser, sub-dean of the Potomac chapter, introduced Louprette, whose outstanding program and spoken comments were very warmly received. The well-attended event was truly a multi-chapter effort as many persons ensured that the details of publicity, hospitality, and myriad logistical considerations were handled smoothly.

—Kathleen C. Cooper

Anne Sears, recitalist Daryl Robinson, and Central New Jersey Dean Eric Plutz

Anne Sears, recitalist Daryl Robinson, and Central New Jersey Dean Eric Plutz

Central New Jersey

September 27, chapter members had dinner together at Metro North in Prince­ton.

October 18, the eighth annual Organ Spectacular was held at St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Princeton. Newly appointed Westminster Choir College organ professor Daryl Robinson played a well-received program of works by Bach, Franck, Cochereau, and Briggs. Afterward, participants enjoyed a convivial reception to meet and welcome him to his new position in Princeton. The recital was cosponsored by the chapter and Westminster Choir College. Pictured are Anne Sears (director of external affairs for Westminster Choir College of Rider University), Daryl Robinson (assistant professor of organ), and Eric Plutz (chapter dean).

—Nicholas J. Steltzer

Metropolitan New Jersey’s Matt Webb (sub-dean), Donna Garzinsky, and Jim Little (dean) (photo: Bev McGregor

Metropolitan New Jersey’s Matt Webb (sub-dean), Donna Garzinsky, and Jim Little (dean) (photo: Bev McGregor

Metropolitan New Jersey

September 28, St. John’s Lutheran Church, Summit (host organist Donna Garzinsky), was the setting for the chapter’s fall kickoff dinner. Beforehand, Garzinsky treated members to a demonstration of the church’s Holt­kamp tracker-action organ and played three pieces to highlight its many colors. After dinner, some members were asked to speak about conferences and conventions they attended this past summer. The well-attended event provided a wonderful evening of fun, music, renewing of friendships, and good food.

—Bev McGregor

Southwest Jersey

September 19, the chapter held a workshop at St. James Lutheran Church, Pitman (Cathy O’Neill, host). An anthem-reading session was led by Dean Rob Hobgood and accompanied by Gail Gassaway and Marilyn Rabbai; one anthem was composed by chapter member Evelyn Larter. Following a sandwich lunch, a tribute organized by Rabbai honored longtime member Helen Taylor, AAGO; it included a narrated slide show, a special song composed for the occasion, a flute and piano duet by one of Taylor’s former students, and greetings from Taylor’s family. Kevin O’Malia, director of music at First United Methodist Church, Germantown, Pa., and organist of Temple B’nai Shalom in East Brunswick, spoke on “Jewish Music for Use in Christian Services.”

October 25, the chapter held a hymn festival for Reformation at Covenant Presbyterian Church, Cherry Hill (Rob Hobgood, host). The festival featured massed choirs from local churches and Collegium Musicum, an early music ensemble from Rowan University. David Garner of Westminster Theological Seminary spoke on the topic “Sola Scriptura” (Scripture Alone).

—Joyce Ann Routon

AGO President John Walker speaking at Chambersburg gathering

AGO President John Walker speaking at Chambersburg gathering

Chambersburg, PA

September 26, the chapter held a covered-dish supper at Central Presbyterian Church (host Helen Wingert). AGO President John Walker was the speaker for the evening. He talked to the 26 members and guests present about what is being done at the national level to encourage more youth to become interested in the pipe organ. He also updated us regarding the newly formed chapters in foreign countries as well as a recent one in our own state of Pennsylvania, the Indiana chapter. Walker’s visit to our chapter was in conjunction with his excellent recital the following day at the same church, commemorating the 75th anniversary of the original installation of its Casavant organ, dedicating new digital pipe work in memory of deceased chapter member John Wingert, and also celebrating Dr. Walker’s own 60th anniversary of having taken his first organ lesson at Wilson College in Chambersburg.

—Helen Wingert

Keith Ferguson, James Clark, Jonathan Christian Petty, Brayden Robicheau, Barb Stookey-Keller, Isabella Dienes, Shawn Daly, and Christine Clewell at Indiana (Pa.) program

Keith Ferguson, James Clark, Jonathan Christian Petty, Brayden Robicheau, Barb Stookey-Keller, Isabella Dienes, Shawn Daly, and Christine Clewell at Indiana (Pa.) program

Indiana, PA

September 20, an enthusiastic audience of more than 40 music lovers gathered for a recital titled “Meet Me in Glen Campbell, Campbell.” The event celebrated the classic Steinway piano housed at First Baptist Church in Glen Campbell. This was the piano featured at the 1904 World’s Fair that inspired the classic 1944 Judy Garland movie Meet Me in St. Louis. Many culturally significant performances took place at this instrument, including Scott Jop­lin’s The Cascades. But the fair’s official piece was Hymn of the West, by AGO founder John Knowles Paine. The chapter dedicated its event to the fusion between piano and organ music, thereby offering a unique insight into our American contribution to world musical culture. To this end, Jonathan Chris­tian Petty (secretary) played a selection of Joplin rags, including The Cascades, which the King of Ragtime wrote to celebrate the fair’s cascades watercourses. Christine Clewell (dean) then played Paine’s Concert Variations on the Austrian Hymn to celebrate the Guild’s contribution to this seminal moment in American musical history. The program was rounded out by Sub-dean Keith Ferguson’s extemporizations on early 20th-century American hymn tunes. Local piano teacher Barb Stookey-Keller and students Brayden Robicheau and Isabella Dienes also performed. This event earned rave reviews from the audience.

—Jonathan Christian Petty

Pittsburgh-PA-AGO-Chapter-News

Presenter Thiemo Janssen with Pittsburgh chapter members

Pittsburgh, Pa.

October 23, opened the 37th season of the chapter’s Organ Artists Series, with Scott Dettra playing the Casavant at Calvary Episcopal Church. The program was given in memory of Hugh D. Young, AAGO, a longtime chapter member. Co­sponsors were Alice C. Young, Gretchen Young Fineman, and Rebecca S. Young.

October 26, members gathered at St. Paul Roman Catholic Cathedral for the monthly dinner and business meeting conducted by Dean Edward Moore. Afterward, Thiemo Janssen presented an informative lecture and slideshow of historic organs of Eastern Frisia in northern Germany. Frisia hosts some of the oldest restored instruments in Germany, beginning with those built in the mid-15th century. Stoplists of several organs were distributed. Janssen played recorded examples of these unique organs, found in old village churches in that region, concluding with a magnificent instrument constructed by Arp Schnitger.

—Barbara McKelway and Cynthia Pock

Bob Parkhurst, Nancy Brown, Steven Ball, Laurie Mueller, Art Kalemkarian, and Christine Laquintano at Southern Pennsylvania program

Bob Parkhurst, Nancy Brown, Steven Ball, Laurie Mueller, Art Kalemkarian, and Christine Laquintano at Southern Pennsylvania program

Southeastern Pennsylvania.

October 14, the chapter visited Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City, New Jersey, home of the world’s largest organ. Although not fully functional, the Midmer-Losh organ has more than 33,000 pipes, including a 64′ Diaphone, and is now being restored. Steven Ball, organist and director of outreach for the Historic Organ Restoration Committee, conducted an extensive and fascinating tour of the former Convention Hall that included viewing pipe chambers, seeing the mechanism of the instrument, and observing those working on the ongoing restoration project. He then played a remarkable recital in the vast Main Auditorium.

—Nancy Brown

Southeast Region

Sarasota-Manatee recitalist Chase Loomer

Sarasota-Manatee recitalist Chase Loomer

Sarasota-Manatee, FL

October 11, Chase Loomer, winner of the Southeast Regional Competition for Young Organists, played a recital at Christ Church, Episcopal, in Bradenton. The program included music by Bach, Locklair, Messiaen, Franck, Brahms, and Widor. Loomers majors in organ performance at the Eastman School of Music, where he studies with David Higgs. A reception followed the recital.

—Paul Adams

Space-Coast-FL-AGO-Chapter-News

John Ferguson leading workshop on “The St. Olaf Choral Tradition”

Space Coast, FL

October 3, the chapter and Advent Lutheran Church of Melbourne presented a workshop with John Ferguson, who demonstrated how to energize the church choir by presenting “The St. Olaf Choral Tradition.” The workshop focused on encouraging the choir director with helpful ideas for how to challenge and stimulate choir members. Points addressed included the following:

• Singers want to be challenged with quality repertoire and high standards in leading worship that exalts and honors God.

• One technique that choir directors should consider is the care of the voice. Singing legato can help develop good vocal production, breath control, dynamic contrast, flexibility, and interval training. Inventive accompaniments keep things interesting, and transpositions expand vocal range. • The choir director needs to establish a consistent time and style of rehearsal.

• The main function of the church choir is to lead God’s people in praise and worship. However, many choir members may judge the worth of their participation not only by their contribution to worship, but also by the content and value of rehearsals. The choir can be challenged both through the repertoire selected and the role designed for them as worship leaders.

• The congregation needs to hear their own voices in singing, or they may stop sing­ing. To keep this from happening, the music dynamics and sound need to be monitored for loudness. John Ferguson retired in 2012 from St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. In his retirement, he continues designing and leading hymn festivals, as well as composing and arranging.

—Barbara Burgess

Atlanta Taylor Organ Competition committee members Charlene Ponder, Timothy Wissle, and Sarah Hawbecker (co-chairs), Nicholas Capozzoli (recitalist), Ray Chenault, Sarah Martin, and Rachel Ficklin

Atlanta Taylor Organ Competition committee members Charlene Ponder, Timothy Wissle, and Sarah Hawbecker (co-chairs), Nicholas Capozzoli (recitalist), Ray Chenault, Sarah Martin, and Rachel Ficklin

Atlanta, GA

October 12, the chapter met for a dinner and recital at All Saints’ Episcopal Church. Words of welcome were given by Raymond and Elizabeth Chenault, organists and choirmasters at the church. An organ recital followed dinner and was presented by Nicholas Capozzoli, winner of the 2015 Taylor Organ Competition. Capozzoli is a student at Oberlin Conservatory of Music, where he studies organ with James David Christie and harpsichord with Webb Wiggins. His program 
included works by Bach, Mendelssohn, Jongen, Craig Phillips, and others. The Taylor Organ Competition is made possible through the legacy of Elizabeth Abbott Taylor, longtime member of the Atlanta chapter. The next competition will be in 2018 and is open to young organ students throughout the United States.

—Rachel Ficklin

Augusta, GA

September 21, the chapter held its opening meeting of the year at First Presbyterian Church. Co-sub-dean John Wilson, AAGO, ChM, is the director of music there and served as host. After a catered dinner, an Organist-Clergy Service was held in the historic sanctuary. The speaker was the Rev. Dr. George Robertson, senior pastor, whose message centered around the clergy and musician partnership in worship.

October 19, the chapter met at Trinity-on-the-Hill United Methodist Church (host organist Lisa Wilson, co-sub-dean). After dinner, an anthem-sharing session was held in the sanctuary. Sharing and directing anthems were Alvin Blount, Don Dupee (dean), Paul Roberts, Barbara Seaborn, Keith Shafer, John Wilson, and Lisa Wilson. Additional officers for the 2015–16 year are David W. Salter (treasurer), Mary K. Gaffney (secretary), and Kenneth H. Courtney (past dean).

—David Salter

Macon-GA-AGO-Chapter-News

Recitalists Gerald Carper, Susan McDuffie, Sandra Smith, Gail Pollack, Robin Eriksen, and Michael McGhee with Phil Parkey of Parkey Organbuilders

Macon, GA

October 18, the chapter held a members’ recital at Northminster Presbyterian Church to celebrate the renovation of the church’s pipe organ. Parkey Organbuilders of Duluth did the renovation work during the summer. Participants included Gerald Carper, Robin Eriksen, Susan McDuffie, Michael McGhee, Gail Pollock, and Sandra Smith.

—Sandra Smith

Savannah, GA

October 15, the chapter enjoyed an evening of “sharing” at Christ Church Episcopal on Johnson Square (Timothy Hall, host). For the meeting, which took the form of a reading session, members were encouraged to bring copies of their favorite choral and organ pieces for the Advent and Christmas seasons. The selections presented were widely varied, and even included a newly published composition by a member of the chapter. Everyone walked away with new ideas. The evening concluded with refreshments and a time of fellowship in the church’s undercroft.

November 1, the chapter attended a choral Evensong at St. John’s Episcopal Church. The service, which centered around the feast of All Saints, included an extended prelude, as well as choral works by Bedford, Norris, Larkin, and Bainton. The choir was conducted by Steven Brannon (host) and accompanied by Angela Fisher. Following the service, there was a wine-and-cheese reception in the historic Green-Meldrum Parish House. Guild members concluded the evening with dinner and fellowship at a local restaurant.

—Justin L. Addington

Glenn Gentry leading a demonstration with students at a Pedals, Pipes & Pizza event in Starkville, MS (Jackson)

Glenn Gentry leading a demonstration with students at a Pedals, Pipes & Pizza event in Starkville, MS (Jackson)

Jackson, MS

October 9–10, mem­bers took the chapter’s annual Pedals, Pipes, & Pizza event on the road to Starkville, with the local assistance of Karen Mur­phy and Len Bobo. Approximately 20 young piano students—ranging in age from five to 17—along with a number of parents and teachers, participated Saturday morning in three rotating sessions that utilized the pipe organs at First United Methodist Church and nearby First Baptist Church. One session featured Barbara Tracy presenting Austin Love­lace’s How the Organ Sings to demonstrate the sounds of the versatile instrument; she was assisted by Billy Trotter as they offered students the hands-on experience of playing and learning how the pipe organ works. A second session was conducted by Glenn Gentry, who brought his collection of organ pipes and related smaller wind instruments to give students an opportunity (with sanitized and protective pipe-end covers) to understand how the organ sounds are produced. The third session, “The Organ in Worship,” was led by Carol Durham and demonstrat­ed how the organ, with its diverse tone qualities and volume levels, can accompany a wide range of worship elements from many denominational traditions; the students were instructed and assisted in playing a hymn. They also enjoyed the chance to play one of their piano pieces on the organ, choosing a registration to suit the spirit of the piece. At noon, a time of fellowship was enjoyed as all reassembled for a pizza lunch. Others assisting with the event were chapter members Len Bobo, Susie Cook, and Sheila Hess, as well as David Dur­ham, Betty Gentry, and Annette Trotter.

—Carol S. Durham

Daniel Steinert, Zollene Reissner, Mila Karamushka, and Tim Baker at Durham-Chapel Hill's PipeScreams!" program

Daniel Steinert, Zollene Reissner, Mila Karamushka, and Tim Baker at Durham-Chapel Hill’s PipeScreams!” program

Durham-Chapel Hill, NC

October 23, the chapter participated in a “PipeScreams!” program at University United Methodist Church, Chapel Hill, that helped raise funds for Habitat for Humanity of Orange County. Billed as a program with “spooky Halloween music,” it featured ghosts, goblins, angels, and assorted monsters. Dean and host Tim Baker jokingly referred to the organists who lent their talents to the show as belonging to the American Association of Dignified Organists. The other “dignified organists” included Mila Karamush­ka, Zollene Reissner, Daniel Steinert (AAGO) with youth vocalist Katie Kin­kade, and Tim Baker. The audience heard a medley consisting of themes from The Munsters and The Addams Family with a touch of Bach; Acclamations from Langlais’s Suite Médiévale; Desseins Éternels from Messiaen’s La Nativité du Seigneur; the UNC Chapel Hill alma mater, Hark the Sound; music from Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera; Reger’s Toccata in D Minor; and Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor. All the pieces were well received by the audience; a good time was had by all.

—Maria Lyn Francisco

Wilmington's Linda Nance at wedding planning program

Wilmington’s Linda Nance at wedding planning program

Wilmington, NC

October 13, the chapter met at Grace United Methodist Church (hosts Judy Siebold, organist, and Jerry Cribbs, music director). The program about wedding planning was presented by chapter member Linda Nance, who has served as a church wedding director since 1986 and has written two books about the subject. She discussed the history of weddings, the importance of detail in planning weddings, and the significant role of the church musician in helping couples plan weddings.

—Sara Bryant

Recitalist Jerrad J. Fenske at Greater Anderson event

Recitalist Jerrad J. Fenske at Greater Anderson event

Greater Anderson, SC

October 25, the chapter was delighted to host Chicago organist Jerrad J. Fenske in recital on the Cornel Zimmer organ at Grace Episcopal Church. He presented a delightful and varied program of music from the United Kingdom, United States, Germany, and France—to a nearly full house!

—Judy Bonham

Stephen Hamilton, Frances WEbb, and Jim Johnson (Greater Columbia)

Stephen Hamilton, Frances Webb, and Jim Johnson (Greater Columbia)

Greater Columbia, SC

October 16–17, the chapter and the Lu­theran Theological Southern Seminary cosponsored organist Stephen Hamilton in two programs. His recital on Friday eve­ning featured works of Pasquini, Valente, Bach, Alain, Messiaen, and Ginastera—played on the 46-rank Flentrop organ (1985). Saturday morning, Hamilton conducted a church-music repertoire class. Participants received handouts featuring extensive listings of new liturgical organ music, and Hamilton played excerpts from many of the 
collections.

—Tony Roof

Sparansburg recitalist Justin Addington

Sparansburg recitalist Justin Addington

Spartanburg, S.C.

October 13, the chapter meeting featured an organ recital by Justin L. Addington in Fullerton Auditorium at Limestone College in Gaffney. Addington is a graduate of the college and also has a master’s degree from Concordia University in Wisconsin. He is the organist and director of music and worship for Skidaway Island United Methodist Church in Savannah, Ga., where he is past-dean of the AGO chapter. Originally from Spartanburg, he is a former sub-dean of the chapter there. Addington’s program included works by Karg-Elert, Bach, Pachelbel, Marcello, Handel, members of the Wesley family (Samuel, Charles Jr., and Samuel Sebastian), Mendelsohn, and Vierne, and hymn arrangements by Albrecht, Behnke, and Hamlin. He played the college’s Aeolian-Skinner organ installed in 1949 in the Curtis Administration Building. The instrument, relocated in 1964, underwent a major renovation in 2005 but has otherwise remained virtually unchanged since its original installation.

—Bill Cooper

Knoxville, TN

September 21, the new season got under way at Church Street United Methodist Church with a recital by Jona­than Ryan, first-prize winner in a number of national and international organ competitions, who has been heard on such radio programs as With Heart and Voice and Pipedreams. He opened with Sowerby’s Pageant, and after a Bach-Vivaldi concerto and etudes by Schumann, concluded with Dupré’s Passion Symphony. Everything was played from memory. The program was jointly sponsored by the chapter and the church’s Master Arts Society.

October 5, at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Oak Ridge, members enjoyed dinner and a movie, The History of the Organ: Sweelinck to Bach. It was filmed in the Netherlands and Germany and featured compositions of Sweelinck, Buxtehude, Weckmann, and Bach. The organists seen playing the historic instruments were Gustav Leonhardt, Bernard Foccroulle, and Hans Heintze. The film is the second part of a larger series on the history of the organ.

—Allison Ensor

Memphis-TN-AGO-Chapter-News

Carolyn Mason, Phil Brown, Lyn Joyner, John Palmer, Jane Gamble, and Kristin Lensch at Memphis “Happy Birthday, Organists” program

Memphis, TN

October 5, the chapter presented a “Happy Birthday, Organists!” program. After a “birthday bash” dinner, complete with candlelit cake, participants adjourned to the sanctuary of Trinity United Methodist Church to enjoy hearing Guild members play organ works of composers born in the month of October—including Galuppi, Howells, Ives, Saint-Saëns, Vierne, Willan, and Young. Performers included Phil Brown, Marc Cerisier, Jane Gamble, Lyn Joyner, Kristin Lensch, Carolyn Mason, and John Palmer. The program was played with excellence and filled listeners’ hearts with delight.

—Jean Jones

Nashville Pops Recital participants (front) Kristen Schussler, Allison Boccia Williams, Elizabeth Smith, Jonathon Setzer; (middle) Darryl Glen Nettles , Nick Bergin, Angela Tipps, Tony Williams, Dakota Hill; (back) Gerry Senechal, Douglas Murray, and Richard Shadinger

Nashville Pops Recital participants (front) Kristen Schussler, Allison Boccia Williams, Elizabeth Smith, Jonathon Setzer; (middle) Darryl Glen Nettles , Nick Bergin, Angela Tipps, Tony Williams, Dakota Hill; (back) Gerry Senechal, Douglas Murray, and Richard Shadinger

Nashville, TN

October 12, a members’ Pops Recital showcased talents of eleven chapter members in a lighthearted variety of patriotic music, improvisation, film-score themes, jazz, a rag, and fondly remembered gems. Angela Tipps showcased her master-of-ceremony talents, providing interesting tidbits about the composers and performers. The recital and preceding dinner were held at Immanuel Baptist Church (Richard Shadinger, host).

—Rhonda Swanson

Great Lakes Region

Installation of Chicago chapter officers

Installation of Chicago chapter officers

Chicago, IL

September 28, chapter members gathered for dinner and a Guild Service of Sung Vespers at Loyola University’s Madonna della Strada Chapel. The service—led by the Schola Cantorum of Madonna della Strada, directed by Steven Betancourt with guest organists Rich­ard Hoskins and Joshua Lucas—featured Stanford’s Magnificat in C. Presider John Murphy, SJ, presented a moving homily on the importance of church musicians, after which chapter officers were installed by Karl Bruhn, Great Lakes Regional Councillor. Pictured are Alan Hommer­ding, Carl Cha­dek, Richard Hoskins, Kelly Dobbs-Mickus, Steven Betancourt, John Ligda, David Jonies, Phillip Kloeckner, Eric Budzynski, CAGO, and Melody Turner, AAGO.

—Steven Betancourt

South Bend, IN

October 10, Alan Morrison was guest presenter at a chapter meeting held at St. Peter Lutheran Church in Misha­waka. He discussed relaxation techniques that he has found to be effective for organists, incorporating yoga, concentration, posture at the organ, and mental imaging. He also offered ideas for interesting, accessible repertoire that can be used for weekly services when practice time is limited. Oct. 11, Morrison played a recital in Memorial Chapel at Culver Academies, where Dean John Gouwens is organist.

—Beverly Butler

Recitalists Jerry Amend, Jackie Amend, and Nicholas Quardokus at Chadala Emerging Artist in Organ Series

Recitalists Jerry Amend, Jackie Amend, and Nicholas Quardokus at Chadala Emerging Artist in Organ Series

Southern Indiana

September 22, Nicholas Quardokus, winner of the 2013 AGO/Quimby Regional Competition in Kalamazoo, was the featured recitalist in the Chadala Emerging Artist in Organ Series. The recital, held at St. John Presbyterian Church in New Albany, included trumpeters Jerry and Jackie Amend playing two selections with organ. The event was presented in memory of Brian “Slick” Anderson, musical conductor and trumpet player for the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. David K. Lamb was the coordinator. Preceding the recital, the chapter hosted a catered dinner at the church.

—Judith E. Miller

Brooks Grantier, Michael Burkhardt, Dean Robinson, and Gayle Beck Stevens at Ann Arbor hymn festival

Brooks Grantier, Michael Burkhardt, Dean Robinson, and Gayle Beck Stevens at Ann Arbor hymn festival

Ann Arbor, Mi

September 27,
the chapter cosponsored a festival of hymns with the Eastern Michigan University School of Music and Dance in Pease Auditorium on the campus of EMU. The theme of the festival was “Sing­ing the Psalms of Life” and featured trumpet, handbells, and a choir of area singers as well as the organ. It was envisioned by Michael Burkhardt, artist and teacher of organ at EMU, who also directed the choir and played for the festival. His hymn accompaniments and improvisations were creative and inspiring. Also featured was the premier performance of a newly arranged setting by Burkhardt of Psalm 137, “How Long, O God?” Newly elected officers were installed by Brooks Grantier, AGO Michigan district convener and sub-dean of the Southwest Michigan chapter.

—Gayle Beck Stevens

Hector Olivera and W. Robert Morrison at Canton Recital

Hector Olivera and W. Robert Morrison at Canton Recital

Canton, OH

September 21
, the first meeting of the new year was held at First Moravian Church in Dover. Randy Gibbs presented a program on Moravian hymnody, and those in attendance sang and heard tunes played on the organ. Noah Carpenter concluded the program with a work by Diane Bish. New yearbooks were handed out, and refreshments followed the meeting. • Oct. 4, Hector Olivera played a recital at Westbrook Park United Methodist Church in celebration of the 90th birthday of W. Robert Morrison. Prior to that, Morrison played selected music on the church’s carillon for all to enjoy.

—Elaine Vaughan

Toledo recitalists Garret Law (Pogorzelski-Yankee prizewinner) and Eligah Baik (photo: Ed Duling)

Toledo recitalists Garret Law (Pogorzelski-Yankee prizewinner) and Eligah Baik (photo: Ed Duling)

Toledo, OH

September 11, chapter members and friends enjoyed a progressive dinner interspersed with organ selections. The evening opened at St. Rose Catholic Church in Perrysburg with appetizers and music on the historic II/27 Garrett House organ (updates by Pilzeker) with traditional works played by George Blackney, and hymn and show-tune arrangements presented by St. Rose parish organist Charlotte Mariasy, with Alysia Geiger on flugelhorn and trumpet. The main course, at Maumee’s First Presbyterian (III/34 Möller, 1969, with additions in 2004), was followed by Locklair’s Rubrics interpreted by Melissa Flowers, and selections by Bach and Vierne played by First Presbyterian’s organist-choirmaster Wayne Whitten. Attendees then crossed the street to St. Paul’s Lutheran for dessert and compositions played on the Rodgers (III/Allegiant 698, 2011) by Dennis Johns, including Johns’s own arrangement, America: September 11, 2001.

• October 11, a picturesque fall afternoon, saw members travel east to join with the Sandusky AGO Chapter to sponsor a recital by a “son” of the chapter, Porgor­zelski-Yankee prizewinner Garrett Law, at St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Oak Har­bor, on the IV/41 Schantz (1970). His program included traditional compositions by Widor, Bach, and Dupré, and more modern works by Sowerby (Comes Autumn Time), Craig Phillips, Calvin Hampton, and Cleveland State student and church musician Buck McDan­iel. Law, a junior at the Cleveland Institute of Music, was assisted by CIM classmate Elijah Baik on cello.

—Ed Duling

Youngstown, OH

October 5, Sean Baran presented a piano recital in conjunction with the Youngstown State University Piano Festival. He played works of Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Chopin. Baran graduated summa cum laude from YSU’s Dana School of Music with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music performance. He studied piano with Caroline Oltmanns and organ with Daniel Laginya. At YSU, Baran himself teaches keyboard musicianship and music theory courses.

—Gary P. Richards

North Central Region

Greater Kansas City, MO

October 12, the chapter’s Schola Cantorum choral ensemble, along with the William Jewell College Concert Choir (conductor Anthony J. Maglione and organists Ann Marie Rigler and Leora Nauta with string orchestra and percussion), were hosted by Visitation Roman Catholic Church in Kan­sas City. Featured in this program was the world premiere of the Requiem by Emmy-nominated film composer Nathanael Pangrazio. Vocal soloists included sopranos Megan Moore, Kristen Sullivan, and tenor Jeffrey Howe.

—Norm Kinnaugh

St. Louis, MO

October 19, “An Evening with Jack Bethards” was a well-attended event at Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church (David Erwin, host organist). After an executive committee meeting, board members joined a record number of participants for a meal with Beth­ards, president and tonal director of Schoenstein & Co. Beth­­ards then presented in detail the company’s philosophy on organbuilding and discussed the installation process that is nearing completion at the church. Louis Patterson, Schoenstein’s vice president, and Mark Hotsenpiller, head of the pipe and voicing department, were also present. Church members joined chapter members to hear Beth­ards explain how church organs need to be built in a repertoire-specific fashion that takes into account the necessities for both accompaniment and solo work. The organ-selection process was reviewed, with Bethards acknowledging that Ladue Chapel planned well and followed a strong progression. David Erwin then presented in tandem with Bethards, to showcase the various voices and colors of the new instrument (sometimes with tongue-in-cheek humor!). To close, he played the final movement of Mendelssohn’s Sonata No. 6 and beautifully displayed the rich sounds of this instrument.

Attendees at program with Jack Bethards of Schoenstein & Co. (St. Louis)

Attendees at program with Jack Bethards of Schoenstein & Co. (St. Louis)

—Dawn Riske

Participants in Madison's organ scholarship fund-raiser recital

Participants in Madison’s organ scholarship fund-raiser recital

Madison, WI

October 2, a recital at St. James Church (Good Shepherd Catholic Parish) featured the original organ compositions of 18 members of the chapter and the Association of Church Musicians. The well-attended recital included organ solos, as well as pieces for organ and instruments or voices, and served as the annual fund-raising event for the Ruth Pilger Andrews Organ Scholarship Fund, which assists organ students of all ages in their study. More than $1,300 was raised. Pictured composers and organists include (front) Tim Mueller, Mark Sikkila, Mark Miller, Deborah Krauss Smith, Esther Criscuola de Laix, Ann Uresk, Lucy De­chéne; (middle) Mark Brampton Smith, Stewart McElroy, Bruce Bengtson, Don DeBruin, Gary Lewis, Ken Stancer, Ken Sosinski; (back) Robert Eversman, Alex Ford, and Mark Bloedow. Max Yount was also present at the event. This first-time-ever project for ACM also resulted in the publication of “Organopia,” a 120-page spiral-bound copy of all the compositions; it may be purchased for $26 (includes shipping). Checks for the correct amount should be made payable to the Association of Church Musicians and mailed to ACM, PO Box 5321, Madison, WI 53705, along with the recipient’s name and mailing address. All proceeds will benefit the Ruth Pilger Andrews Scholarship Fund. A complete listing of the collection’s contents is available at http://madisonacm.org/
recital.html.

—Deborah Krauss Smith

Southwest Region

Albuquerque new officers Barbara Johnson, Lois Engelkes, Rick Wild, Sanelma Sutton, and Marla Riggins-Clark (photo: Kathleen Madden)

Albuquerque new officers Barbara Johnson, Lois Engelkes, Rick Wild, Sanelma Sutton, and Marla Riggins-Clark (photo: Kathleen Madden)

Albuquerque, NM

September 19, the chapter met at St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church. The program began with the installation of new officers: Rick Wild (dean); Sanelma Sutton (sub-dean); Lois Engelkes (treasurer); Maribeth Gunning (secretary); and Barbara Johnson, Marla Riggins-Clark, Loretta Robinson, Maxine Thévenot, Steven Wood­bury, and Fabian Yanez (members at large). After that, Lois Engelkes and Sanelma Sutton presented a program of “Organ Music for Manuals.” A reception followed.

—Sanelma Sutton

Austin, TX

October 17, chapter members gathered at St. Mat­thew’s Episcopal Church (Jean Fuller, host) for breakfast tacos. Afterward, there was a presentation by Charlotte Kroeker, executive director of the Church Music Institute in Dallas, titled “Singing from the Same Page: Models for Successful Clergy and Musician Relationships.”

—Jack Martin

Beaumont recitalists Andrew Segrest, Alex Gilson, and Samuel Gaskin

Beaumont recitalists Andrew Segrest, Alex Gilson, and Samuel Gaskin

Beaumont, TX

October 3, the chapter hosted its fall recital at First United Methodist Church, featuring three former students of the late Hugh E. Thompson: Samuel Gaskin, Alex Gilson, and Andrew Segrest. Gaskin is pursuing a degree in psychology with a minor in music at the University of Texas–San Antonio; Gilson is a senior at the University of North Texas, earning a degree in organ performance; and Segrest graduated from Lamar University with a degree in music education and is now a graduate student in organ performance at UNT. On FUMC’s 78-rank Aeolian-Skinner organ, the three recitalists played works by Bach, Messiaen, Alain, Latry, and Vierne, exploring the resources of the instrument and featuring the most recent addition, the Festival Trumpet.

—W. Chris Richter

Central Texas

October 20
, members met at Richfield Christian Church in Waco for a snack supper provided by Dean Bobby Safley, who afterward conducted the business meeting. Plans for future meetings were discussed, and then the group adjourned to the church sanctuary for a program of “light” music. Those playing were Bobby Safley, Brad White, Lottie Evans, Naomi Scrivener, and Bonnie Belanger. It was a fun-filled evening with performers in costume. The chapter is grateful to the church for the use of its facilities and to all those involved in making the evening a musical success.

—Lottie S. Evans

Corpus Christi Pipescreams Spooktacular participants

Corpus Christi Pipescreams Spooktacular participants

Corpus Christi, TX

September 21
, the chapter held a dinner meeting at First Christian Church. Host Leslie Peart (dean) presented a slideshow from his 26 years of leading organ tours to the United Kingdom. • Oct. 30, the chapter presented its annual Halloween Pipescreams Spooktacular Concert at First United Methodist Church (Brad and Jane Kisner, hosts). Performers pictured are (front) Donna Bogan, Judith Calhoun; (back) Leslie Peart, Lee Gwozdz, Brad Kisner, Michael Mazzatenta, and Hank Carillo; also present was Roy Daniels. The chapter meets on the first Wednesday of each month for “lunch bunch”—a time of fellowship.

—Brad Kisner

West Region

Kent Eggert, Robert York, Hyunju Hwang, and Richard Metzler at Long Beach members' recital

Kent Eggert, Robert York, Hyunju Hwang, and Richard Metzler at Long Beach members’ recital

Long Beach, CA

October 6
, the chapter met for a members’ re­cital at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Parish in Lomita. Kent Eggert, parish organist, hosted the event and also played extensive introductions to the opening and closing hymns. He was joined by Hyunju Hwang, Richard Metzler, and Robert York. Each artist brought something different to the program. The evening ended with a reception.

—David Feit-Pretzer

Los Angeles gathering with tax preparer Emily Sang (seated at right).

Los Angeles gathering with tax preparer Emily Sang (seated at right).

Los Angeles, CA

September 28, the chapter’s education committee sponsored an event featuring tax preparer Emily Sang, CPA. Members came together at the Church of Our Saviour in San Gabriel over a potluck supper. Afterward, Sang spoke about tax and financial concerns that were of great interest to church musicians.

October 12, the chapter presented a performance by Richard Elliott (principal organist at the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City) at Pasadena First United Methodist Church.

—Karla Devine

Ventura County, CA


September 27
, the chapter kicked off its programming year by celebrating the installation of a new pipe and digital hybrid organ at Simi Valley United Methodist Church. The Rodgers Artist 599 console was installed last March, in time for Palm Sunday and Easter. The new organ supplements the four-rank Möller organ that served the congregation since the 1970s. Christoph Bull, professor of music at UCLA and resident organist of First Congregational Church in Los Angeles, played a recital of original organ works as well as his own compositions and arrangements. The chapter was delighted to see a church packed with attendees. A reception followed the program.

—Ivan Shobe

Olympic Penninsula participants at Plymouth Church, Seattle

Olympic Penninsula participants at Plymouth Church, Seattle

Olympic Peninsula, WA

October 17, chapter members traveled to Plymouth Church, Seattle, to see the new C.B. Fisk organ. On the ferry ride there, Scott and Georgene Corey showed a video they had made of the organ while it was still in the Fisk shop. At the church, organist Douglas Cleveland gave a brief recital to demonstrate the instrument, modeled on the Cavaillé-Coll organ at St. Fran­çoise Church in Lyon, France. Fisk representatives were on hand to talk about the installation and answer questions. Chap­ter members were then given the opportunity to play the organ and tour the pipe room. A no-host lunch followed at a restaurant in Seattle.

—Joann Richardson

Byron Schenkman at Seattle program (photo: David Nichols)

Byron Schenkman at Seattle program (photo: David Nichols)

Seattle, WA

October 12
, the chapter held its monthly meeting in the screening room of Naked City Brewery and Taphouse. Several members arrived early and ate together prior to the meeting. The program was given by international recording artist Byron Schenkman, cofounder of the Seattle Baroque Orchestra, and dean-elect Henry Lebedinsky. Their topic covered a wealth of information about the harpsichord, how to play it expressively, and how to better translate organ (or piano) technique into effective harpsichord playing. Conversely, they noted, knowing how printed notes are actually played on a harpsichord, working within the limitations of the instrument, equips us to play them more musically at the organ. The presentation includ­ed repertoire from France, Italy, and Germany that was played on harpsichord, portative organ, and clavichord. Those in attendance were given the opportunity for a question-and-answer time after each presenter.

—David Stinson

Andrew Unsworth (left) with Spokane masterclass participants (front) Darin Mckee, Taylor Giese and Robert Carr; (back) Dean Janet S. Ahrend, St. John's Cathedral organist John Bodinger, and host Kent Brocklebank (photo: Vince Roland)

Andrew Unsworth (left) with Spokane masterclass participants (front) Darin Mckee, Taylor Giese and Robert Carr; (back) Dean Janet S. Ahrend, St. John’s Cathedral organist John Bodinger, and host Kent Brocklebank (photo: Vince Roland)

Spokane, WA

October 10, the chapter and St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral (Kent Brocklebank, host) presented a masterclass by Andrew Unsworth, Tabernacle organist at Salt Lake City. Brocklebank provided transportation and accommodations for Uns­worth’s trip. More than 20 people attended, including one organist who drove 180 miles from Missoula, Mont. Three volunteers came forward for playing and critique: Taylor Giese of Spokane (student of Janet Ah­rend), Darin McKee of Pullman (organist at Pullman Presbyterian Church and Pioneer Hill Ward of LDS), and Robert Carr of Spokane (organist at Our Lady of Lourdes Ca­thedral). Uns­worth’s instruction skills called upon a broad spectrum of music and performance—from interpreting the composer’s intent and structure at the time of composition, to being wary of over­emphasizing the academic aspects of the music, to basic relaxation techniques that help release the energy of the piece. The observers benefited greatly, as did the three performers. The following day, Unsworth gave a recital at the cathedral, including works of Guilmant, Franck, Bach, Schreiner, and Walton.

—Vince Roland

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